Monday, June 18, 2012

To Pray or Meditate

It seems to us that people pray too much. All they're doing is asking some unknown deity / juju to help them with a mundane problem--not a spiritual problem but a mundane one. It reminds us of the sticky-faced kid sitting on Santa's lap in the mall concourse asking for expensive Christmas presents. Meditation, on the other hand, is listening, both to your inner self and for spiritual guidance in your problems.

In days gone by when Grandpa followed the plow and Mother did the laundry by hand on a scrubboard, they spent time with their hands busy and their minds open to receive information. This is the ideal of meditation. You have probably heard that you must sit in a certain fashion with a white robe of unbleached fabric and say certain mantras or yantras to release the mind from daily cares. Most of this is pure blah-blah (for want of a ruder term) window dressing. Yes, we teach meditation; but it is extremely elementary and certainly free from esoteric hoodoo. The only thing that sometimes worries us is that people do not do any protective measures, just to be sure that no naughty occult practitioner is playing games and sending bad vibes or entities against you ... and knows enough about such things to be effective. ("Psychic attack! Psychic attack! Squawk! I'm under psychic attack! Oh gasp.")

But once you have established a connection with the Beyond, connecting to the entity we call a Guide, such protective measures become less essential. All you need to do is sit down quietly and wait for answers to come to the questions you may have. We recommend doing it always at the same time every day, when the sun is below the horizon. We also recommend that you take a drink of red wine and perhaps eat a piece of dark chocolate to adjust your endorphines so that your body will be more relaxed. Another way of relaxing the body, of course, is to have a good strong orgasm a few moments before going into meditation. Perhaps you might want to think of meditation and prayer as the two sides of a coin. The prayer is the asking; meditation is the receiving. What is the good of asking if you never bother to wait and listen for a reply?

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